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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 82 (some duplicates have been removed)
. one of my clarion -- four years ago i talked at clarion which is a wonderful science-fiction five week-long six weeklong boot camp and teachers come in and go a week and i did week 4 which i was told was when everybody cries and others break down. they did not have nervous breakdowns which was great. at one point, one of my guys -- can you tell whether your letters going to make it? and i said no. and some of us are brilliant and some of us -- how do you tell? no. ones who are going to make are the ones who write and write and write. some of the ones who are brilliant may have written brilliant stories and never write again. but the ones who get in and they write every day and finish their stories and then write the next one they will make it. i saw him four months ago in arlington as he was nominated for a nebula award and he said you know, it works. he didn't get the award but still very proud of him. my wife and i loved the audio versions and never worked. you are such a terrific voice actor. did you have those voices in mind as you were writing the book? i suppose i did but also ha
an engineering degree and dad is a former science teacher. >> pj's engineering background and my master's degree definitely has played a part in our success. >> another secret that helped the jonases become soap stars... [ goat bleats ] ...everyone has to pitch in. >> i have a rule around here. i call it my "youngest person rule." and that means that the youngest person capable of doing a job is the one who does it. >> just like cows, goats need to be milked every day. >> sometimes i'll even get up as early as 6:00. >> another big job is filling the online orders that come in from people all over the country. >> i'd say the hardest thing about living in a family that runs a business is when my little brothers or sisters don't do their jobs and i get stuck doing them. >> you have to work with your siblings all the time. you, like, you don't get a break from them. and that can get really annoying. >> but there's also a lot of positives. >> i mean, you get to do a lot of cool things that most kids don't get to do. >> some of my friends often want to come over and help out. they come over and they b
often our conversations about these issues are exclusively engineering and physical science kinds of questions. those matter, no doubt. they're fundamental, but there's a social dimension to this as well, which neighborhoods are affected, which individual people are affected, and it's predictable. >> fascinating, zone "a" ev evacua evacuated, low-lying residents there were twice as likely to be residents of. >>> i want to bring in ed markey, co-sponsor of the only climate bill to ever pass the chamber of congress. congressman, what is your reaction to the stunning absence of this issue that you worked so hard on and labored over and ground out a large bill with tons of technical details to carve votes on and it's now disappeared from the political conversation? >> well, i think that -- i think that mother nature decided that she was going to inject it into this election. if it wasn't going to be raised in any of the debates, then she was going to find a way of having this be discussed. and so this election for next tuesday is now framed. it's mother nature versus the unrestrained
tonight 10:00 p.m. eastern. but first more "viewpoint" coming right up. politics. >>science and republicans do not mix. >>now it's your turn at the only online forum with a direct line to eliot spitzer. >>join the debate now. >> eliot: we've heard all the promises excuse, smart lines and grotesque misrepresentations. now it's time to choose. the choice is easy. on one hand you have the leader who saved us from sure fiscal di it waster, watched over a recuperating economy preserved our national security and guided our nation's international relations in rough waters insured landmark universal access to healthcare and pushed historic social policy with respect to immigration and civil rights. his challenger is supply-side reagan omics disciple who says he is fit to lead. he says he has a plan but when asked over and over for specifics can't produce. the arithmetic doesn't work. he's a governor who shares the social views he embraced to get to the primaries. he became a meyer pawn of the radical republican party, not a leader of it. on issue after issue the choice couldn't be m
. susan mchale, director of the social science research institute and one of the corps organizers of the network is here with us today. can you please stand and be recognized? thank you. [applause] >> we also made a pledge to educate our university community about ethics. it is one thing to know the rules, regulations and policies. it is another thing to create a culture where every employee wants to do the right thing the first time everytime. through training and awareness building efforts, we are trying to help people understand the how, when, where and why of reporting. i assure you can state takes this commitment very seriously. that is not a glib promised. to prove it we have stepped up our efforts and compliance. like most universities and state has dozens of compliance professionals. they are responsible for insuring research funds are appropriately used. they monitor our ncaa compliance, financial reporting, conformity to federal laws covering privacy rights and crime reporting and administer many more regulations related to the health, welfare and safety of those on camp
-- the national academy of sciences, the journal, proceedings of the national academy of sciences took a survey of scientists who work on this a couple of years ago, and there was agreement among 97% of scientists that fossil fuel emissions from human activity lead to global warming. are warming the atmosphere. that's an incredibly high consensus. so it's 97% in agreement. 3% in disagreement. at this consensus. at this point the scientific consensus is very, very strong that burning coal and oil and fossil fuels is warming the planet and leading to these extreme weather situations. >> so, this question really, then, is directed to the 3% of scientists as we look at the latest cover of "business week" it speaks for itself, coral, we had new york city mayor michael bloomberg endorsing the president in a piece largely focused on climate change. is this a wake-up call and could it end the debate? >> the problem is you can't ever say any one specific weather event is caused by climate change but you can look at the growing stack of reports saying we know we're going to see more of this. the national
. and our motto is where science meets community. our team does really cutting edge research on different kinds of prevention strategies, pre-exposure prophylaxis. and if you go to our website, join prep hiv, you'll see all of the many exciting studies that we have as well as our partnership with san francisco city clinic in launching the first demonstration project of pre-exposure prophylaxis, taking antihiv medicines to prevent new infections. we're studying topical gels, retro microbicide. the way we're going to end this epidemic is through a vaccine, we've controlled other infectious diseases through a cure. we're proud of our staff who contribute to this as well as the many study participants. and i'm just going to close with a quick word about the project. the way that this project came about was actually one of our staff members, janey vincent who is our graphic designer, you'll see some of her beautiful work inside, noticed that there was -- she's hiding. (applause) >> she noticed that president obama had designated part of his stimulus money to nih for the national institutes of
to his last which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> here is this a shot from 31st and lake shore drive that he took at 3:00 and a gorgeous polestar sunrise from rosewood beach highland park illinois but we thought we would go up to lake superior this time we have seen these images who is a meteorologist and she is one of our former intern's and look at these shots from dust and both of the waves on lake superior and the snow dustin tells us he is already tired of the snow but you have a long winter ahead of you because it's only starting beautiful shots though. the first signs that the light northeast wind and a 25 degree temperature drop you need a 15 degree drops so that clouds conform. in a month that is almost 11 degrees cooler than november last year we are averaging 42.5 degrees. today for instance we have a high of 48. but we have averaged about 5 degrees below normal. look at these temperatures down in texas and oklahoma while the child grows up to the northeast part of the reason for that and these are current temperatures look at
-berkeley's greater good science center. here researchers study the benefits of feeling gratitude or thankful. >> it really encourages you to think outside of yourself for a moment. >> reporter: research shows individuals who kept a journal and detailed their gratitude were 25% happier than those who did not. >> the people who did the gratitude showed increases in happiness and reductions in stress, reductions in vulnerability, the physical symptoms like headaches, rashes, dizziness. >> reporter: kovack says her boys today are perfectly healthy and that for her family, gratitude plays a big part in their lives. >> at dinner we go around and we each say what we're grateful for. >> reporter: dr. kim mulvihill, cbs 5 healthwatch. >> the center has launched a new gratitude project. anyone can sign up online. for more information go to cbssf.com. click on news and then click on health. and we'll be right back. ,,,,,,,,,, this is hayden. ,,,,,,,,,, that's elizabeth. and that's skyler... and his mom, nancy. they're just a few of the californians who took it on themselves to send you a message about
kind of promise and the political sciences say george bush was the most polarized presidency. it's a condition of life and what obama's hoping is that republicans if he's re-elected sort of collapse a little bit in exhaustion and work with him in a short period of time. >> and regardless if it's a popular electoral split, it's going to be close. almost 50% of the country will feel disenchanted with whoever is elected. and the fault lines will be quite amazing. >> let's talk about where we were last week. it felt like there was momentum in mitt romney's direction. where are they tonight? >> there was some momentum still building off that successful denver debate. and then it sort of hit the reality of two more debates after that and the continuing campaign. and i think that this momentum was starting to slow before the hurricane hit. but certainly the hurricane had a piece of this. the fact that the president gets to look presidential. you had him up there with his bomber jacket in air force one. >> and chris christie of endorsed hip. -- hymn. >> -- endorsed him. >> we talk about
of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus. the garden was designed by thoma
is experimenting with is a program that dhs science and technology created and if you are ready to write it down, you can look online, you can google it, it's called the next generation incident command system or nics. it's a command and control web-based tool that we're looking with mit lincoln labs and dss and i would foresee when we stand up our wing operation center at miramar that the marine corps liaison and the navy liaison and if need be the guard liaison would have access to that tool. the next generation command system is a fantastic web-based command and control technology that we expect to use in the future. with that, thank you. >> thanks. colonel yeager. >> i just want to say you can't underestimate the risk presented by these environments we fly in and really the relationships that we build with cal fire and the training prepares us to mitigate that risk. as rear admiral riveras said, bad things tend it happen at night. they also happen on the weekend and i think we have a 3-day week jepld here but i assure you we are ready to respond. >> from personal experience in 2007, i
what this does for this region. you know the bay area has become the blue angels of science. we do lots of stunts, and we are very successful at doing those stunts and we do them at high speeds, and between this project and the project for cal train to electifiy it over the next seven years $3 billion is going to be spent regionally on transit here, and we can say thank you to the secretary of transportation and to the regional transit authorities who have create thursday opportunity for the transportation. >> >> that will create a 22nd century of transit for the tronst century of jobs so thank you to secretary lahood and thank you to the leadership for all that we have accomplished here today. [applause] >> peter rogof was dominated to serve in the federal administration by the department of transportation in 2009 by president barack obama. he has over see the disbursement throughout the country through the american reinvestment act and has done so meeting every milestone established by that act. getting money into hands of transit operators whose budgets were severely strained
the department of the cleveland clinic. he has directed the transitional science institute's and is the ok.hor of the new boat it is great to have you on the program. >> thank you. >> how will the digital revolution creates a better health care? >> you are used to digitize books and music. how about people? we can get through sequencing once genome. basically everything fed makes you take -- that makes you tick we can change medicine. tavis: give me examples. >> let's say we want to change the cardiogram, and i want to use the smartphone. i have a couple of sensors. i put my finger on the sensor, and i basically have my cardiogram. i can do yours if you would like. if you want to put your fingers on it, there it is. you have a normal heart rhythm. tavis: please tell me that is good. >> you are doing fine. i can look in your heart. i do not need a stethoscope anymore. i am a cardiologists. tavis: how can you be a cardiologists without a stethoscope. >> here is a device where you see everything with high- resolution ultrasound. it is basically the size of a cell phone, and if i want i could
industrial revolution in which the application of science utterly transforms the way we do almost everything. one of the latest transformative technologies is 3-d printing. it sounds absurd, it sounds impossible, but it promises to refashion whole arias of design. -- whole areas of design. >> due to the crafted objects made with care and great precision, they haven't been scrupted, or machine pressed. a different process has been employed. this is 3-d presenting. -- printing. >> at the design studio in london they can not only conceive products, they can make them, thanks to a technology that is falling in price and so becoming more accessible. it allows you to make just about anything. i'm being scanned with software, then building a precise template of my face. that will then be used to print out a 3-d me. so i've been scanned. what's next in the process? >> we prepare it into a print-ready file and we take you over here to this machine. >> you don't have to send it off to a factory somewhere? >> no, right here. it's an office-friendly machine that sits in a corner. and this will print you
the whole man here, you're the senior science journalist for the "huffington post." okay, we we could put walls up, but shouldn't we go to the source of the problem fossil fuels. >> you have to mitigate the effects because in some respects it is a little too late to reverse this problem. but you also want to work as hard as you can to stop it from getting any worse. we can talk about this kind of two degree celsius problem, and we can get to the technical stuff. but the truth is it's already gotten so bad and even if we stopped putting emissions in the atmosphere it will still get worse for many, many years. >> cenk: let's talk about that for a minute. we have thisthere is magical reverse when we need it. it seems that that would be the time. >> they're saying, the scientists will do all that. >> cenk: seriously is there a way to reverse it. >> to reverse climate change? >> cenk: it just times. >> it a function of making sure it doesn't get worse. we are we at that level. >> cenk: that was a hard-hitting ad against mitt romney against climate change. should democrats--that was an outside
of the social science research institute and a co-organizer of the research is here today. susan, can you please stand to be recognized? thank you. [applause] we also made a pledge to educate the university community about ethics. it's one thing to know the rules, regulations, and policies; it's another thing to create a culture where every employeements to do the right thing the first time every time. through training and awareness building efforts, we're trying to help people understand the how, when, where, and why of reporting. i assure you that penn state takes this commitment very seriously. that's not a glib promise. to prove it, we stepped up efforts in compliance. like most universities, penn state has dozens of compliance professionals. they're responsible for ensuring research funds are appropriately used, they monitor the nca compliance, the financial reporting, conformity to federal laws covering privacy rights and crime reporting, and they administer regulations related to the health, welfare, and safety of those on campuses including our patients. what we've discovered, however, i
% in favor. >> we're talking about 11 fewer days to go ahead and teach the math, the science and the reading. it's important for our students. >> my biggest concern is giving more money to the senators and having them just spend it away. >> prop 30 would raise the state's sale tax and income tax on californians making $250,000 or more. >>> sports of a measure that would require genetically modified foods to be labeled will hold several rallies today in the bay area. supporters said that consumers should be able to choose whether to eat the foods. and opponents say their safe to eat so additional labeling should not be required. they say, if so, the cost will be passed on to the consumer. >>> groundbreaking ceremonies was held for a new food coto the area. and there are plans for other stores to be built in the same shopping center. >>> the california health department is warning people not to eat bulk house farms carrot chips because they could be contaminated to salmonella. they're voluntarily recalling 16-ounce bags of carrot chips with the best if used by dates of november 12th and 13th.
're talking about 11 fewer days to teach the math, science, reading and language arts that is really important for our students. >> i would say this is about the worse i've seen. or it will be if this doesn't pass. >> reporter: governor brown put proposition 30 on the ballot to raise $6 billion that has been allocated this year for csu budgets. it would also increase the state's sales tax. the tax increase would not apply to gasoline or food. >> no on proposition 30, thank you for voting. >> the funding isn't guaranteed to go to the schools. my biggist concern is giving everyone more money to the senators and assembly people up there and have it just spend it away before we raise taxes on anyone we need to get control of spending. we have a spending problem not a taxing problem. >> reporter: this week field polls showed that support the trended up. reporting live, jana katsuyama, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> the battle over proposition 37 on the labeling of genetically modified foods led to charges and denials today. a spoátar -- a supporter of the measure said that the fda had came up with the
question is turnout, that and rational self-interest. the young who believe in science, women who believe in protecting their rights, latinos who can see a brighter future with a supportive president all need to get out, show up, and vote. there's no reward for a failure. in a free society, a democratic society is a failure, deeply personal, you blew it if you don't vote. let's see where it stands. i'm joined by mother jones washington bureau chief david corn and joy reid. do you think i'm a little strong? >> no. >> i don't want to talk to anybody after this election if they haven't bothered to vote. with four days to go, president obama and mitt romney made their closing arguments today at multiple stops in ohio and wisconsin. take a look at some of the sights and sounds from this day of campaigning. ♪ >> in this campaign he's tried as hard as he can to repackage, to repackage these same policies and offer them up as change. >> do you want more of the same or do you want real change? >> giving more power back to the biggest banks, that's not change. >> and we need real change. >> anoth
of the political science final. please write a scenario where world events and powers provide and results in total thermonuclear warfare results and the next question was, please create a lab practical to test your theory. is there a lab practical to test this theory? haiti. as you know, a few years ago the haitian people suffered an
of geosciences at princeton university. he has been studying climate science for three decades now. good morning. thank you for being here. you live in lower manhattan. you saw the storm's devastation first hand. were you surprised by sandy's magnitude? >> well orve, of course, i was surprised. even though i do this kind of work professionally. sandy was not caused by global warming, but it was made worse. believe me, it's no laughing matter. this situation is going to get worse as long as the world continues to warm and the world is going to continue to warm as long as we keep burning primarily coal oil and natural gas for energy. that's putting carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. that's pumping up the temperature of the earth and causing the seas to rise. >> let's talk specifically about manmade climate change. how much do you blame that? >> climate change, as i said, didn't cause sandy, but it made it worse. climate changed caused, for instance, the sea level at new york's battery to be a foot higher than it was a century ago. that made the storm surge worse, that increased the flooding of th
in both brain health and hour owe science. on the mental health board lynn has worked to increase the board standards and content of mhb more engaging and directed. produce more professional annual reports. i think most importantly really worked tirelessly to make sure the interests of the mental health community are well represented not only in the district but across san francisco. she does a great service to her role in the mental health board ask lynn i want to thank you. you've been the district 2 appointee since i came into office. i want to thank you for your service. i know you've been doing it for a while and i want to thank you for all of your efforts not just on our behalf but the mental health community. * district 2 behalf want to honor you for serving and thank you for all you do. (applause) >>> thank you, supervisor farrell and thank you, members of the board, for this recognition. given that san francisco has in per capita terms an extraordinarily large population of people suffering from serious mental illness, the mental health board is the most important policy
keep being climate change designers and anti-science in a variety of ways. >> anti-science, we are still dealing with 46 million people on food stamps. we are still dealing with a 50% increase in the national debt and 100% increase in the gasoline price. now, in new jersey, they can only get 10 gallons. we are dealing with a lot of economic problems. >> part of what sandy tells us, yes, we are dealing with all of those things. that's not somehow separate about trying to get a laugh line by talking about the rising ocean. >> everybody wants to see c-130s unloading electric trucks to help them. they expect the government to show up. it is what level the government takes irresponsibilities. not enough time to see what this storm has done. >> if we keep thinking of government's response as only about response after the fact rather than thinking about the money that is saved and the policies and the fairness associated with doing disaster planning through fair governorer nance in the first place. >> you are talking about wanting a cop to do on the job. what melissa is talking about
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. to start her own interior design business. she's got a growing list of clients she keeps in touch with using e-mail marketing from constantcontact.com. constantcontact is easy and affordable. it lets her send out updates and photos that showcase her expertise and inspire her customers for only $15 a month. [ dog barking ] her dream -- to be the area's hottest interior design office. [ children laughing ] right now, she just dreams of an office. get a free trial at constantcontact.com. >> tonight a new study from the project for excellence in journalism. look at the three major networks evaluating positive and negative coverage of the two presidential candidates. since i don't know what "positive" means, i am throwing that out and i can do that because i'm the anchor of the program. but i absolutely do know what negative means and here's the stats on that. gov. romney, 36% of the coverage has been negative, 63% neutral. nbc, and fox news 12% negative, 60% neutral. join us now from north carolina. berna
, favors republicans. this is not rocket science. to the extent that voting in florida is a debacle, it's one made by design. the ballot in florida is ten pages long. and with fewer days to vote, you get really long lines. but that's the way it goes in florida now. leading up to the election, florida republicans cut the time for early voting in half. so now floridians stand in long lines. they pass new restriction on registering voters so thousands fewer new voters signed up. and the governor has tried to purge the voter rolls. in south florida and palm beach county, 30,000 ballots were printed wrong. clerks have been copying what the voters marked on to new ballots that can fit into the tabula tabulating machines. dozens asked for absentee ball the lots and still haven't gotten them because they screwed up the ballots. the situation is worse in broward county where people have waited for weeks for absentee ballots. you can say that florida's election is another debacle in the making were it not already a debacle right now. and it is. joining us is joy reid. she's an msnbc contributor w
can see, it is a difficult science. we will be following the basic, outside the margin medicare. and in indiana, another question mark. real clear politics does nt have an average. the democrat is leading the republican in the latest press be simple, but y only three points, and therefore it remains a question mark. north dakota, we are giving it to the republican. over five and a half lead, close enough to call six on the democrat. and then we go to virginia. a question mark. democrat tim king has a 01-point lead on the republican challenger georgeallen. in wisconsin another? decrat jimmy baldwin has a half of a percent lead on the republican. so if we give the democrats plus for, plus four, and plus 34 republicans, the fact is it gets kind of interesting. we are now at 5246. excuse me, 49. forty-six. forty-nine, and we have a really kind of interesting battle as hyper partisan as, well, harry reid can be, it looks like he may be a fixture in washington of a fixture in profit washington. so it will be kind of interesting because the republican controlled house will remain repub
't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use, it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. >>> what was the most lied about statement president obama made this year? what did the president say that republicans then lied about, day in and day out? and even devoted one night of their convention to lying about? this. this was the most lied about thing president obama said this year. >> if you were successful, somebody along the line gave you some help. there was a great teacher somewhere in your life. somebody helped to create this unbelievable american system that we have that allowed you to thrive. somebody invested in roads and bridges. if you got a business, you didn't build that. somebody else made that happen. the internet didn't get invented on its own. government research created the inter
of science and data behind this. so like changing it is scary. even though as we said the response rates are going down. people are hard for find. people will cling to what they've been doing. i don't think anybody is going to necessarily embrace what survey monkey should be the new standard. it's been interesting. i'm glad we've been able to talk to you guys about it, but a lot of people who do polling have been unwilling to use our data because they're like, well, this is really going to upset all the other pollsters. so it's--you know, it's touchy with them. >> free service versus the traditional lockdown service. i could imagine. you know a thing or two about that. you've been through a lot of industries notably the music industry, and now the survey monkey. dave, thanks for being on the show. >> thanks for having me. >> gavin: when we come back i'll give you my thoughts about climate change, drug change and jesse jackson when we come back. to you. to help you make informed decisions, watch current tv's politically direct lineup. only on current tv. vote smart. our democracy depends
this up, dave. science class is over. >> i'm going to drink this. because i didn't make one of those for myself. >> thank you very much. >> thank you very much. >> interesting, thanks, sweetie. it's a good thing we've had a few drinks, because -- >> sara is warming up the crowd next door for any question they want to ask us. first, this is "today" on nbc. >>> it is time for 3, 2, 1 live with sara haines. she's at the nintendo world store. >> hey, we found our guy, it's ryan from new york. he has a question. >> i'm a refugee from the lower east side. i'm wondering if you could be a star in any tv show besides your own, what would it be? >> well, that's a good -- "smash." >> you would? >> love it. sing for us. >> i couldn't possibly -- >> beautiful. ♪ thanks for asking >> he's adorable. i think i'd do a "law and order" thing. i love them so much i have them memorized. i know the lines. it would be easy. >> thank you, guys. >> thank you, sweetie. >>> on monday, singer christina aguilera is going to join us. >> actor/comedian kevin pollack. >>> fall fashion. it's definitely going to wa
at being a geek god, filled with again with science and technology. i'm thinking, how can i get better? i had the sensors encompasses a bluetooth. you have phones in your pocket. i'll bet you could actually sort of fly a plane with this. so i got the kids together and they put it in the plane. it turns out the autopilot starts regulating the state department and can be recognizable by go that day. but what that may be realized is that there's something very exciting going on in what used to be hard to do stuff, electronics and others, others, others, my little discovery in terms of my children got me into the recognition that may be hardwired, maybe physical stuff was something i could do and it was interesting and scary anymore. so i started messing around and learning a little bit and we got a computer board have learned more about sensors and kind of what way down rabbit hole. today i run a chunk from any with a mexican drone factory. i'll say it again, mexican drone in fact true. five years ago i was the dad messing around at the park with my kids and i would put montrose in the earth
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 82 (some duplicates have been removed)